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CODE4LIB  September 2012

CODE4LIB September 2012

Subject:

Re: Displaying TGN terms

From:

Joe Shubitowski <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Code for Libraries <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 17 Sep 2012 16:02:35 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (271 lines)

Hi David,
 
I am posting a reply from Patricia Harpring. Managing Editor, Getty
Vocabularies
 
Regards,
Joe Shubitowski
Getty Research Institute
 
>>>>>>>>>>>
David,
 
You ask a good question. At the Getty Vocabulary Program, we recommend
that you concatenate a recommended Label to identify the place.
 
In brief, the label that is probably most useful to you comprises these
elements: 
the English preferred name (if any) of the target place (if none,
default to overall record-preferred name), 
then in parens the parents in ascending order to the level of Nation,
using for each parent the flagged Display name if any; if none, the
English preferred name; if none, default to overall record-preferred
name), and so on for each parent to level of Nation (i.e., to the place
type = 81002 "primary political unit" as place type #2). If no parent is
a primary political unit, go to level of continent. Close parens. 
Then include the preferred place type for the target place in parens. 
Include subject_id of the target place.
Like this: In this example, the city Orvieto has no English name, so
you use the record-preferred name. For parents, "Terni province" is an
example of using a display name for its record, and "Italy" is an
example of using the preferred English name from its record when
displayed as parents in horizontal Label displays.
 
Orvieto (Terni province, Umbria, Italy) (inhabited place) [7005124]
 
The topic is discussed in a few places on our Web site, including the
links below. I hope that helps. Note the discussion of special display
names that are flagged to accommodate horizontal displays of parents. 
 
On a related topic: As I presented at a few conferences this summer, we
are investigating the possibility of developing URIs for the Getty
vocabularies. Although we are not certain this will happen, many of us
here are optimistic. We will announce progress on this front when it is
resolved.
 
Sincerely,
 
Patricia
 
Patricia Harpring, PhD
Managing Editor, Getty Vocabulary Program
[log in to unmask]
 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Labels for geographic places are succinctly described here:
http://www.getty.edu/research/publications/electronic_publications/cdwa/30place.html#label
Including examples; [I've added the TGN subject_ids here, which are
missing because CDWA is speaking of labels in general, not of TGN
specifically]
 
- Orvieto (Terni province, Umbria, Italy) (inhabited place) [7005124]
- Oldenburg (Franklin county, Indiana, United States) (inhabited place)
[7013833]
- Galatia (Turkey) (general region) [7016662]
- Republic of Ireland (nation) [1000078]
- Cyprus (Asia) (island) [1006894]
- Belgica Prima (Gallia Belgica, Gaul) (former administrative division)
[7030321]
 
Labels for various purposes
Labels with the inverted form of the preferred name followed by parents
and place type are suited for alphabetical lists; note that only names
of physical features will generally be inverted, as discussed in
PLACE/LOCATION AUTHORITY - PLACE NAME. 

- Arrowsmith, Mount (Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada)
(mountain) [1103769]
- Erie, Lake (North and Central America) (lake) [7026039]
- Hathala (Northwest Frontier, Pakistan) (inhabited place) [1083488]
- Heicheng (Nei Mongol, China) (deserted settlement) [7001846]
- Los Angeles (California, United States) (inhabited place) [7023900]
- Zama (Siliana government, Tunisia) (lost settlement) [6006668]

Labels with the natural order form of the preferred name followed by
parents and place type are suited for wall labels, slide labels, and
captions. 

- Mount Arrowsmith (Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada)
(mountain) [1103769]
- Lake Erie (North and Central America) (lake) [7026039]
- Hathala (Northwest Frontier, Pakistan) (inhabited place) [1083488]
- Heicheng (Nei Mongol, China) (deserted settlement) [7001846]
- Los Angeles (California, United States) (inhabited place) [7023900]
- Zama (Siliana government, Tunisia) (lost settlement) [6006668]
 
Labels with the parents in descending order (as opposed to ascending
order, illustrated in above examples), may be used for lists where
results need to sort by parent; for example, all the places in one
nation or state will sort together. 
 
Orléans .......... (inhabited place) 
 (World, Europe, France, Centre region, Loiret) [7008337]
  
Orléans .......... (inhabited place) 
 (World, North and Central America, Canada, Ontario) [1014994]
  
Orleans .......... (inhabited place) 
 (World, North and Central America, United States, California, Humboldt
county) [2013138]
  
Orleans .......... (inhabited place) 
 (World, North and Central America, United States, Illinois, Morgan
county) [2029517]
  
Orleans .......... (inhabited place) 
 (World, North and Central America, United States, Indiana, Orange
county) [2033199]
  
Orleans .......... (inhabited place) 
 (World, North and Central America, United States, Iowa, Appanoose
county) [2560830]
  
Orleans .......... (inhabited place) 
 (World, North and Central America, United States, Iowa, Dickinson
county) [2035393]
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
 
 
http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/vocabularies/tgn/about.html#info
 
Label
Brief text identification of the place, concatenated from the preferred
Name, parent string, and preferred Place Type. Whereas the Subject ID
identifies the place in the database, the Label serves as an easily
legible heading to identify the place for end-users. In the TGN Online
display (an entry in a results list display is illustrated below), the
Label is displayed with the hierarchy icon (to the left of the Label) in
order to permit the end-user to go to the hierarchy to browse for
places.

 

Example
 
Note that the above Label illustrates the parent string in descending
order, which is useful to allow sorting among homographs in results
lists. For other displays, it will be more user-friendly to display the
parents in ascending order. 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/vocabularies/guidelines/tgn_3_3_names_terms.html#3_3_2
See this section
3.3.2.5.19
     Constructed names: >> Display names
[...]
 » Display names 
A Display Name is used in horizontal displays (e.g., in results lists
on the Web and in the Place fields of ULAN). Construct a Display Name if
the following is true: 1) the preferred name or the preferred English
name would be confusing or ambiguous in a parent string, either because
it has the same name as its child, it is a historical nation with the
same name as a modern nation, or its name is otherwise misleading, and
2) there is no other name in the record that could serve as a Display
Name. Construct a Display Name by adding the place type to the trunk
name; the part that you have added should be in lower case (to
distinguish it from proper names found in sources). 
For example, the immediate parent of the city of Siena, Italy has the
same name as the city, so Siena province is a variant name for that
parent in horizontal displays: e.g., Siena (Siena province, Toscana,
Italia). In another example, a river in Lancashire, England is named
Island, which is confusing; thus the Display Name should be Island
river. 

>>> <[log in to unmask]> 9/17/2012 12:12 PM >>>
We use the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names for coding place names
in our museum and archival cataloguing systems. We're currently
struggling with the best way to display and make these terms searchable
in our online database.

Currently we're just displaying the term itself, which is flawed,
because just seeing "Springfield" or "Florence" doesn't give the user
enough information to figure out where something was really made.

But we're finding that the number of variant place types in TGN makes
it hard to figure out a concise way of indiciating a more detailed place
name that will work consistently across all entries in the thesaurus.

For example, the full hierarchy for Florence (the one in Italy) is 

Florence (inhabited place), Firenze (province), Tuscany (region), Italy
(nation), Europe (continent), World (facet)

Neigborhoods and other local subdivisions can be even more of a
mouthfull:

Notting Hill (neighborhood), Kensington and Chelsea (borough), London
(inhabited place), Greater London (metropolitan area), England
(country), United Kindom (nation), Europe (continent), World (facet)

Ideally I'd probably like to show the above as  "Florence, Italy" and
"Notting Hill, London, England"

But I'm having trouble coming up with an algorithm that can
consistently spit these out in the form we'd want to display given the
data available in TGN.

Would welcome any ideas or feedback on this.

Thanks,

David


__________

David Dwiggins
Systems Librarian/Archivist, Historic New England
141 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114
(617) 994-5948
[log in to unmask]
http://www.historicnewengland.org


>>> <[log in to unmask]> 9/17/2012 12:12 PM >>>
We use the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names for coding place names
in our museum and archival cataloguing systems. We're currently
struggling with the best way to display and make these terms searchable
in our online database.

Currently we're just displaying the term itself, which is flawed,
because just seeing "Springfield" or "Florence" doesn't give the user
enough information to figure out where something was really made.

But we're finding that the number of variant place types in TGN makes
it hard to figure out a concise way of indiciating a more detailed place
name that will work consistently across all entries in the thesaurus.

For example, the full hierarchy for Florence (the one in Italy) is 

Florence (inhabited place), Firenze (province), Tuscany (region), Italy
(nation), Europe (continent), World (facet)

Neigborhoods and other local subdivisions can be even more of a
mouthfull:

Notting Hill (neighborhood), Kensington and Chelsea (borough), London
(inhabited place), Greater London (metropolitan area), England
(country), United Kindom (nation), Europe (continent), World (facet)

Ideally I'd probably like to show the above as  "Florence, Italy" and
"Notting Hill, London, England"

But I'm having trouble coming up with an algorithm that can
consistently spit these out in the form we'd want to display given the
data available in TGN.

Would welcome any ideas or feedback on this.

Thanks,

David


__________

David Dwiggins
Systems Librarian/Archivist, Historic New England
141 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114
(617) 994-5948
[log in to unmask]
http://www.historicnewengland.org

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