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CODE4LIB  February 2013

CODE4LIB February 2013

Subject:

Re: GitHub Myths (was thanks and poetry)

From:

"Johnston, Leslie" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Code for Libraries <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 20 Feb 2013 12:56:26 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (221 lines)

It's technically breaking GitHub's terms of service to have multiple individuals sharing a single account.

Leslie

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Code for Libraries [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of
> Karen Coyle
> Sent: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 12:07 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [CODE4LIB] GitHub Myths (was thanks and poetry)
> 
> Sure. Although the question was more: how can we make it easy to have a
> bunch of accounts? Or should we have a c4l account that we share (and
> monitor for spam)? I think anything wysiwyg-y and familiar (wordpress
> certainly meets those criteria) would be fine. There does seem to be a
> lot of familiarity with Wordpress in the group.
> 
> kc
> 
> 
> On 2/20/13 8:45 AM, Ethan Gruber wrote:
> > Wordpress?
> >
> >
> > On Wed, Feb 20, 2013 at 11:42 AM, Karen Coyle <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> >
> >> Shaun, you cannot decide whether github is a barrier to entry FOR ME
> >> (or anyone else), any more than you can decide whether or not my
> foot hurts.
> >> I'm telling you github is NOT what I want to use. Period.
> >>
> >> I'm actually thinking that a blog format would be nice. It could be
> >> pretty (poetry and beauty go together). Poems tend to be short, so
> >> they'd make a nice blog post. They could appear in the Planet blog
> >> roll. They could be coded by author and topic. There could be
> comments! Even poems as comments!
> >> The only down-side is managing users. Anyone have ideas on that?
> >>
> >> kc
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> On 2/20/13 8:20 AM, Shaun Ellis wrote:
> >>
> >>>> (As a general rule, for every programmer who prefers tool A, and
> >>>> says that everybody should use it, there’s a programmer who
> >>>> disparages tool A, and advocates tool B. So take what we say with
> a
> >>>> grain of salt!)
> >>> It doesn't matter what tools you use, as long as you and your team
> >>> are able to participate easily, if you want to.  But if you want to
> attract
> >>>   contributions from a given development community, then choices
> >>> should be balanced between the preferences of that community and
> >>> what best serve the project.
> >>>
> >>>  From what I've been hearing, I think there is a lot of confusion
> >>> about GitHub.  Heck, I am constantly learning about new GitHub
> >>> features, APIs, and best practices myself. But I find it to be an
> >>> incredibly powerful platform for moving open source, distributed
> software development forward.
> >>>   I am not telling anyone to use GitHub if they don't want to, but
> I
> >>> want to dispel a few myths I've heard recently:
> >>>
> >>> ------------
> >>>
> >>> * Myth #1 : GitHub creates a barrier to entry.
> >>> * "To contribute to a project on GitHub, you need to use the
> >>> command-line. It's not for non-coders."
> >>>
> >>> GitHub != git.  While GitHub was initially built for publishing and
> >>> sharing code via integration with git, all GitHub functionality can
> >>> be performed directly through the web gui.  In fact, GitHub can
> even
> >>> be used as your sole coding environment. There are other tools in
> the "eco-system"
> >>> that allow non-coders to contribute documentation, issue reporting,
> >>> and more to a project.
> >>>
> >>> ------------
> >>>
> >>> * Myth #2 : GitHub is for sharing/publishing code.
> >>> * "I would be fun to have a wiki for more durable poetry (github
> >>> unfortunately would be a barrier to many)."
> >>>
> >>> GitHub can be used to collaborate on and publish other types of
> >>> content as well.  For example, GitHub has a great wiki component*
> >>> (as well as a website component).  In a number of ways, has less of
> a "barrier to entry"
> >>> than our Code4Lib wiki.
> >>>
> >>> While the path of least resistance requires a "repository" to have
> a
> >>> wiki, public repos cost nothing and can consist of a simple
> "README" file.
> >>>   The wiki can be locked down to a team, or it can be writable by
> >>> anyone with a github account.  You don't need to do anything via
> >>> command-line, don't need to understand "git-flow", and you don't
> >>> even need to learn wiki markup to write content. All you need is an
> >>> account and something to say, just like any wiki. Log in, go to the
> >>> anti-harassment policy wiki, and see for yourself:
> >>> https://github.com/code4lib/**antiharassment-
> policy/wiki<https://git
> >>> hub.com/code4lib/antiharassment-policy/wiki>
> >>>
> >>> * The github wiki even has an API (via Gollum) that you can use to
> >>> retrieve raw or formatted wiki content, write new content, and
> >>> collect various meta data about the wiki as a whole:
> >>> https://github.com/code4lib/**antiharassment-
> policy/wiki/_**access<h
> >>> ttps://github.com/code4lib/antiharassment-policy/wiki/_access>
> >>>
> >>> ------------
> >>>
> >>> * Myth #3 : GitHub is person-centric.
> >>>> "(And as a further aside, there’s plenty to dislike about github
> as
> >>>> well, from it’s person-centric view of projects (rather than
> >>>> team-centric)..."
> >>> Untrue. GitHub is very team centered when using organizational
> >>> accounts, which formalize authorization controls for projects,
> among other things:
> >>> https://github.com/blog/674-**introducing-
> organizations<https://gith
> >>> ub.com/blog/674-introducing-organizations>
> >>>
> >>> ------------
> >>>
> >>> * Myth #4 : GitHub is monopolizing open source software
> development.
> >>>> "... to its unfortunate centralizing of so much free/open source
> >>>> software on one platform.)"
> >>> Convergence is not always a bad thing. GitHub provides a great,
> free
> >>> service with lots of helpful collaboration tools beyond version
> control.
> >>>   It's natural that people would flock there, despite having lots
> of
> >>> other options.
> >>>
> >>> ------------
> >>>
> >>> -Shaun
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> On 2/19/13 5:35 PM, Erik Hetzner wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> At Sat, 16 Feb 2013 06:42:04 -0800, Karen Coyle wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>> gitHub may have excellent startup documentation, but that startup
> >>>>> documentation describes git in programming terms mainly using *nx
> >>>>> commands. If you have never had to use a version control system
> >>>>> (e.g. if you do not write code, especially in a shared
> environment), "clone"
> >>>>> "push" "pull" are very poorly described. The documentation is all
> >>>>> in terms of *nx commands. Honestly, anything where this is in the
> >>>>> documentation:
> >>>>>
> >>>>> On Windows systems, Git looks for the |.gitconfig| file in the
> >>>>> |$HOME| directory (|%USERPROFILE%| in Windows’ environment),
> which
> >>>>> is
> >>>>> |C:\Documents and Settings\$USER| or |C:\Users\$USER| for most
> >>>>> |people,
> >>>>> depending on version (|$USER| is |%USERNAME%| in Windows’
> environment).
> >>>>>
> >>>>> is not going to work for anyone who doesn't work in Windows at
> the
> >>>>> command line.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> No, git is NOT for non-coders.
> >>>>>
> >>>> For what it’s worth, this programmer finds git’s interface pretty
> >>>> terrible. I prefer mercurial (hg), but I don’t know if it’s any
> >>>> better for people who aren’t familar with a command line.
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> http://mercurial.selenic.com/**guide/<http://mercurial.selenic.com/
> >>>> guide/>
> >>>>
> >>>> (As a general rule, for every programmer who prefers tool A, and
> >>>> says that everybody should use it, there’s a programmer who
> >>>> disparages tool A, and advocates tool B. So take what we say with
> a
> >>>> grain of salt!)
> >>>>
> >>>> (And as a further aside, there’s plenty to dislike about github as
> >>>> well, from it’s person-centric view of projects (rather than
> >>>> team-centric) to its unfortunate centralizing of so much free/open
> >>>> source software on one platform.)
> >>>>
> >>>> best, Erik
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> Sent from my free software system <http://fsf.org/>.
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >> --
> >> Karen Coyle
> >> [log in to unmask] http://kcoyle.net
> >> ph: 1-510-540-7596
> >> m: 1-510-435-8234
> >> skype: kcoylenet
> >>
> 
> --
> Karen Coyle
> [log in to unmask] http://kcoyle.net
> ph: 1-510-540-7596
> m: 1-510-435-8234
> skype: kcoylenet

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