LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for CODE4LIB Archives


CODE4LIB Archives

CODE4LIB Archives


CODE4LIB@LISTS.CLIR.ORG


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CODE4LIB Home

CODE4LIB Home

CODE4LIB  October 2013

CODE4LIB October 2013

Subject:

ANN: Memento Client for Chrome

From:

Robert Sanderson <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Code for Libraries <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 9 Oct 2013 11:54:16 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (67 lines)

Dear all,

We are delighted to be able to announce the availability of the beta
Memento extension for Chrome. The extension is available in the Chrome
store:

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/memento/jgbfpjledahoajcppakbgilmojkaghgm?hl=en&gl=US

Below, we include the description that accompanies the extension in the
Chrome store, which highlights its web time travel and 404-circumventing
features.

Your feedback would be much appreciated to help us get it ready for prime
time.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank:
- Harihar Shankar for the effort he invested in developing the extension.
- Luydmila Balakireva, Martin Klein, Michael Nelson, James Powell, for
their input during the development process.


Many thanks,

Rob Sanderson and Herbert Van de Sompel,
Los Alamos National Laboratory


==

Description

Travel to the past of the web by right-clicking pages and links.

Memento for Chrome allows you to seamlessly navigate between the present
web and the web of the past. It turns your browser into a web time travel
machine that is activated by means of a Memento sub-menu that is available
on right-click.

First, select a date for time travel by clicking the black Memento
extension icon. Now right-click on a web page, and click the "Get near "
option from the Memento sub-menu to see what the page looked like around
the selected date. Do the same for any link in a page to see what the
linked page looked like. If you hit one of those nasty "Page not Found"
errors, right-click and select the "Get near current time"
option to see what the page looked like before it vanished from the web.
When on a past version of a page - the Memento extension icon is now red -
right-click the page and select the "Get current time"
option to see what it looks like now.

Memento for Chrome obtains prior versions of pages from web archives around
the world, including the massive web-wide Internet Archive, national
archives such as the British Library and UK National Archives web archives,
and on-demand web archives such as archive.is. It also allows time travel
in all language versions of Wikipedia. There's two things Memento for
Chrome can not do for you: obtain a prior version of a page when none have
been archived and time travel into the future. Our sincere apologies for
that.

Technically, the Memento for Chrome extension is a client-side
implementation of the Memento protocol that extends HTTP with content
negotiation in the date time dimension. Many web archives have implemented
server-side support for the Memento protocol, and, in essence, every
content management system that supports time-based versioning can implement
it. Technical details are in the Memento Internet Draft at
http://www.mementoweb.org/guide/rfc/ID/. General information about the
protocol, including a quick introduction, is available at
http://mementoweb.org.

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTS.CLIR.ORG

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager