LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for CODE4LIB Archives


CODE4LIB Archives

CODE4LIB Archives


CODE4LIB@LISTS.CLIR.ORG


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CODE4LIB Home

CODE4LIB Home

CODE4LIB  August 2014

CODE4LIB August 2014

Subject:

Re: Creating a Linked Data Service

From:

Dan Scott <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Code for Libraries <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 9 Aug 2014 01:40:39 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (107 lines)

On Wed, Aug 6, 2014 at 2:45 PM, Michael Beccaria <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> I have recently had the opportunity to create a new library web page and
> host it on my own servers. One of the elements of the new page that I want
> to improve upon is providing live or near live information on technology
> availability (10 of 12 laptops available, etc.). That data resides on my
> ILS server and I thought it might be a good time to upgrade the bubble gum
> and duct tape solution I now have to creating a real linked data service
> that would provide that availability information to the web server.
>
> The problem is there is a lot of overly complex and complicated
> information out there on linked data and RDF and the semantic web etc.


Yes... this is where I was a year or two ago. Content negotiation / triple
stores / ontologies / Turtle / n-quads / blah blah blah / head hits desk.


> and I'm looking for a simple guide to creating a very simple linked data
> service with php or python or whatever. Does such a resource exist? Any
> advice on where to start?
>

Adding to the barrage of suggestions, I would suggest a simple structured
data approach:

a) Get your web page working first, clearly showing the availability of the
hardware: make the humans happy!
b) Enhance the markup of your web page to use microdata or RDFa to provide
structured data around the web page content: make the machines happy!

Let's assume your web page lists hardware as follows:

<h1>Laptops</h1>
<ul>
  <li>Laptop 1: available (circulation desk)</li>
  <li>Laptop 2: loaned out</li>
   ...
</ul>

Assuming your hardware has the general attributes of "type", "location",
"name", and "status", you could use microdata to mark this up like so:

<h1>Laptops</h1>
<ul>
  <li itemscope itemtype="http://example.org/laptop"><span
itemprop="name">Laptop 1</span>: <span itemprop="status">available</span>
(<span itemprop="location">circulation desk</span>)</li>
  <li itemscope itemtype="http://example.org/laptop"><span
itemprop="name">Laptop 2</span>: <span itemprop="status">loaned
out</span></li>
   ...
</ul>

(We're using the itemtype attribute to specify the type of the object,
using a made-up vocabulary... which is fine to start with).

Toss that into the structured data linter at
http://linter.structured-data.org and you can see (roughly) what any
microdata parser will spit out. That's already fairly useful to machines
that would want to parse the page for their own purposes (mobile apps, or
aggregators of all available library hardware across public and academic
libraries in your area, or whatever). The advantage of using structured
data is that you can later on decide to use <div> or <table> markup, and as
long as you keep the itemscope/itemtype/itemprop properties generating the
same output, any clients using microdata parsers are going to just keep on
working... whereas screen-scraping approaches will generally crash and burn
if you change the HTML out from underneath them.

For what it's worth, you're not serving up linked data at this point,
because you're not really linking to anything, and you're not providing any
identifiers to which others could link. You can add itemid attributes to
satisfy the latter goal:

<h1>Laptops</h1>
<ul>
  <li itemscope itemtype="http://example.org/laptop"
itemid="#laptop1"><span itemprop="name">Laptop 1</span>: <span
itemprop="status">available</span> (<span itemprop="location">circulation
desk</span>)</li>
  <li itemscope itemtype="http://example.org/laptop" itemid="#laptop2"><span
itemprop="name">Laptop 2</span>: <span itemprop="status">loaned
out</span></li>
   ...
</ul>

I guess if you wanted to avoid this being a linked data silo, you could
link out from the web page to the manufacturer's page to identify the
make/model of each piece of hardware; but realistically that's probably not
going to help anyone, so why bother?

Long story short, you can achieve a lot of linked data / semantic web goals
by simply generating basic structured data without having to worry about
content negotiation to serve up RDF/XML and JSON-LD and Turtle, setting up
triple stores, or other such nonsense. You can use whatever technology
you're using to generate your web pages (assuming they're dynamically
generated) to add in this structured data.

If you're interested, over the last year I've put together a couple of
gentle self-guiding tutorials on using RDFa (fulfills roughly the same role
as microdata) with schema.org (a general vocabulary of types and their
properties). The shorter one is at https://coffeecode.net/rdfa/codelab/ and
the longer, library-specific one is at
http://stuff.coffeecode.net/2014/lld_preconference/

Hope this helps!

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTS.CLIR.ORG

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager