LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for CODE4LIB Archives


CODE4LIB Archives

CODE4LIB Archives


CODE4LIB@LISTS.CLIR.ORG


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CODE4LIB Home

CODE4LIB Home

CODE4LIB  March 2016

CODE4LIB March 2016

Subject:

Re: personalization of academic library websites

From:

Eric Lease Morgan <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Code for Libraries <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 23 Mar 2016 19:55:50 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (75 lines)

On Mar 23, 2016, at 6:26 PM, Mark Weiler <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I'm doing some exploratory research on personalization of academic library websites. E.g. student logs in, the site presents books due dates, room reservations, course list with associated course readings, subject librarians.  For faculty members, the site might present other information, such as how to put material on course reserves, deposit material into institutional repository, etc.   Has anyone looked into this, or tried it?

I did quite a bit of work on this idea quite a number of years ago, measured in Internet time. See:

  MyLibrary@NCState (1999)
  http://infomotions.com/musings/sigir-99/

  The text describes MyLibrary@NCState, an extensible
  implementation of a user-centered, customizable interface to a
  library's collection of information resources. The system
  integrates principles of librarianship with globably networked
  computing resources creating a dynamic, customer-driven front-end
  to any library's set of materials. It supports a framework for
  libraries to provide enhanced access to local and remote sets of
  data, information, and knowledge. At the same, it does not
  overwhelm its users with too much information because the users
  control exactly how much information is displayed to them at any
  given time. The system is active and not passive; direct human
  interaction, computer mediated guidance and communication
  technologies, as well as current awareness services all play
  indispensible roles in its implementation. 


  MyLibrary: A Copernican revolution in libraries (2005)
  http://infomotions.com/musings/copernican-mylibrary/

  "We are suffering from information overload," the speaker said.
  "There is too much stuff to choose from. We want access to the
  world's knowledge, but we only want to see one particular part of
  it at any one particular time."... The speaker was part of a
  focus group at the North Carolina State University (NCSU),
  Raleigh, back in 1997... To address the issues raised in our
  focus groups, the NCSU Libraries chose to create MyLibrary, an
  Internet-based library service. It would mimic the commercial
  portals in functionality but include library content: lists of
  new books, access to the catalog and other bibliographic indexes,
  electronic journals, Internet sites, circulation services,
  interlibrary loan services, the local newspaper, and more. Most
  importantly, we designed the system to provide access to our most
  valuable resource: the expertise of our staff. After all, if you
  are using My Yahoo! and you have a question, then who are you
  going to call? Nobody. But if you are using a library and you
  have a question, then you should be able to reach a librarian.


  MyLibrary: A digital library framework & toolkit (2008)
  http://infomotions.com/musings/mylibrary-framework/

  This article describes a digital library framework and toolkit
  called MyLibrary. At its heart, MyLibrary is designed to create
  relationships between information resources and people. To this
  end, MyLibrary is made up of essentially four parts: 1)
  information resources, 2) patrons, 3) librarians, and 4) a set of
  locally-defined, institution-specific facet/term combinations
  interconnecting the first three. On another level, MyLibrary is a
  set of object-oriented Perl modules intended to read and write to
  a specifically shaped relational database. Used in conjunction
  with other computer applications and tools, MyLibrary provides a
  way to create and support digital library collections and
  services. Librarians and developers can use MyLibrary to create
  any number of digital library applications: full-text indexes to
  journal literature, a traditional library catalog complete with
  circulation, a database-driven website, an institutional
  repository, an image database, etc. The article describes each of
  these points in greater detail.

Technologically, the problem of personalization is not difficult. Instead, the problem I encountered in trying to make a thing like MyLibrary a reality were library professional ethics. Too many librarians thought the implementation of the idea challenged intellectual privacy. Alas.

—
Eric Lease Morgan
Artist- And Librarian—At-Large

(574) 485-6870

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTS.CLIR.ORG

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager