LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for CODE4LIB Archives


CODE4LIB Archives

CODE4LIB Archives


CODE4LIB@LISTS.CLIR.ORG


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CODE4LIB Home

CODE4LIB Home

CODE4LIB  November 2017

CODE4LIB November 2017

Subject:

Re: Help with parsing dates?

From:

Andromeda Yelton <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Code for Libraries <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 3 Nov 2017 13:34:18 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (86 lines)

In re Github facets - some projects do use labels to specifically indicate
issues that may be beginner-friendly. The specific terms they use vary but
you can find a searchable/filterable aggregation at http://up-for-grabs.net/
. Also OpenHatch is a friendly community aimed at getting people involved,
and they have a place you can search for issues that might be relevant
(e.g. https://openhatch.org/search/?language=Python&q= ).

On Fri, Nov 3, 2017 at 9:29 AM, Julie Swierczek <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> Dan,
>
> This. Is. Awesome. And your interpretation of the date string "1933,
> 1937-1938, 1941" is correct - I meant to say it should be 1933/1941. This
> sort of error is exactly why I wanted to approach this programmatically,
> and not type the dates by hand.  I used student employees to copy the data
> from the HTML pages into spreadsheets, and to check for spelling errors.
> However, I didn't want to use students to type the dates. I feel like that
> would be risking the creation of too much metacrap.  I can't even type them
> correctly myself, so I can't expect students to have 100% accuracy, either.
>
> Also, for anyone else following from home, I have to say why I love this
> solution compared to all the others.
>
> 1) I have over 400 spreadsheets, some with over 1000 lines. While I
> *could* use OpenRefine or Excel for a certain amount of date cleaning, that
> assumes I am interested in - and have the time  for - opening each file
> individually and working on the dates one spreadsheet at a time. I can set
> this script up to run through a bunch of csv files. I don't need to look at
> them.  (And, yes, I know how to set up a task in OpenRefine and save it and
> use it again later - and I was working on building one of those - but that
> is more time consuming than I want this task to be.)
>
> 2) This doesn't' use Ruby or perl or other tools that I don't know and
> don't have time to use now. I said I can handle basic Python, and that's
> what this is.
>
> 3) This is written simply and clearly, and doesn't do too much of 'let's
> prove how awesome I am by using as few lines of code as possible', which is
> really hard for newbies to interpret and change.   (You know what I'm
> talking about - something that a newbie would write in 200 lines and
> someone else says, "Yeah, you idiot, I can do that in two lines". Cf. ALL
> OF STACK OVERFLOW.)
>
> 4) Building on point number 3, this is written simply and clearly enough
> that I can figure out how to modify it further if I come across any other
> date cases that I haven't discovered so far.  I would even feel confident
> enough to submit a pull request if I do develop solutions for other date
> formats for this.
>
> 5) Further, this is written simply and clearly enough that I can use this
> as a model for figuring out how to write other Python stuff to handle other
> similar tasks.  This is now my favorite thing in all of GitHub. (I wish
> GitHub had a special facet for 'newbie friendly' stuff.  I know that is
> somewhat subjective, but I can't tell you how many 'easy' tools that have
> been recommended to me that would take me roughly a week to figure out how
> to run once, and possibly another month of trying to troubleshoot error
> messages to get it to actually work. Cf. http://tpverso.com/an-open-
> letter-to-open-source-projects-for-lams/)
>
> I again want to thank Dan for this code and I also want to commend it to
> everyone else's attention as the sort of code that is really friendly to
> newbies. If you are thinking of writing a tool and you want to be able to
> share it with institutions of all sizes, with a really low barrier to entry
> (e.g., the knowledge of how to put a .py file in a directory, change the
> filename in the .py file, and then run 'python test.py'), then this is a
> good model of how code should be written. Also, while I am on my soapbox,
> here's a great model for documentation: https://github.com/
> CarletonArchives/BagBatch.
>
> Thus Endeth the Lecture.
>
> Dan, thanks again. This just made my semester.
>
> Julie Swierczek
> Transformer of Dates
>



-- 
Andromeda Yelton
Senior Software Engineer, MIT Libraries: https://libraries.mit.edu/
President, Library & Information Technology Association: http://www.lita.org
http://andromedayelton.com
@ThatAndromeda <http://twitter.com/ThatAndromeda>

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTS.CLIR.ORG

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager