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Right. The key is to make sure the N band has its own SSID. Mac Laptops, at
least, will always glom onto the strongest signal, so if you're broadcasting
on G and N with the same name, most of the time the laptop will grab the G
because the signals go through walls better. If we can just choose, e.g.,
"Code4Lib2011 N", that problem goes away.

On Tue, Jan 18, 2011 at 12:46 PM, Richard, Joel M <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I think you missed a critical part of that message, Jonathan. (which I
> didn't write, BTW)
>
> "it does not mean that you have to have one..."
>
> Robert is saying that 802.11n is recommended and you'll have a better
> experience with it. It is not a requirement. Besides, I believe any router
> that supports the "n" standards is also backwards compatible to prior
> standards.
>
> --Joel
>
>
> Joel Richard
> IT Specialist, Web Services Department
> Smithsonian Institution Libraries | http://www.sil.si.edu/
> (202) 633-1706 | (202) 786-2861 (f) | [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
> On Jan 18, 2011, at 11:15 AM, Jonathan Rochkind wrote:
>
> > On 1/18/2011 9:05 AM, Richard, Joel M wrote:
> >>
> >>> Our central wireless group has recommended that if everyone has an
> 802.11n card (5Ghz radio spectrum) in their device that they will likely
> have a much better experience for connectivity  it does not mean that you
> have to have one it will just be better download speeds etc.
> >
> > There is ABSOLUTELY no way to guarantee that 100% of 200 conference
> > attendees will have 802.11n cards in their devices.
> >
> > I suspect the vast majority of us will bring the devices we have, and
> > not upgrade our devices just for the conf.
> >
> > I would suggest you make sure IT is assuming that NOT "everyone" will
> > have 802.11n -- there's no way that's going to happen.
> >
> > Jonathan
>



-- 
Bill Dueber
Library Systems Programmer
University of Michigan Library