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+1.

kc

On 11/4/13 3:40 AM, Ross Singer wrote:
> Eric,
>
> I can't help but think that part of your problem is that you're using
> RDF/XML, which definitely makes it harder to understand and visualize the
> data model.
>
> It might help if you switched to an RDF native serialization, like Turtle,
> which definitely helps with regards to "seeing" RDF.
>
> -Ross.
> On Nov 4, 2013 6:29 AM, "Ross Singer" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> And yet for the last 50 years they've been creating MARC?
>>
>> For the last 20, they've been making EAD, TEI, etc?
>>
>> As with any of these, there is an expectation that end users will not be
>> hand rolling machine readable serializations, but inputting into
>> interfaces.
>>
>> That is not to say there aren't headaches with RDF (there is no assumption
>> of order of triples, for example), but associating properties with entity
>> in which they actually belong, I would argue, is its real strength.
>>
>> -Ross.
>> On Nov 3, 2013 10:30 PM, "Eric Lease Morgan" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>> On Nov 3, 2013, at 6:07 PM, Robert Sanderson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>>> And it's not very hard given the right mindset -- its just a fully
>>> expanded
>>>> relational database, where the identifiers are URIs.  Yes, it's not 1st
>>>> year computer science, but it is 2nd or 3rd year rather than post
>>> graduate.
>>>
>>> Okay, granted, but how many people do we know who can draw an entity
>>> relationship diagram? In other words, how many people can represent
>>> knowledge as a relational database? Very few people in Library Land are
>>> able to get past flat files, let alone relational databases. Yet we are
>>> hoping to build the Semantic Web where everybody can contribute. I think
>>> this is a challenge.
>>>
>>> Donít get me wrong. I think this is a good thing to give a whirl, but I
>>> think it is hard.
>>>
>>> ó
>>> ELM
>>>

-- 
Karen Coyle
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m: 1-510-435-8234
skype: kcoylenet