LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for CODE4LIB Archives


CODE4LIB Archives

CODE4LIB Archives


CODE4LIB@LISTS.CLIR.ORG


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CODE4LIB Home

CODE4LIB Home

CODE4LIB  August 2012

CODE4LIB August 2012

Subject:

Re: Maker Spaces and Academic Libraries

From:

Lisa H Kurt <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Code for Libraries <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 27 Aug 2012 11:46:19 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (310 lines)

I think some folks have already responded to 'why' pretty well, but I
figured I would add to the discussion from our perspective on the ground
at UNR in the DeLaMare Library and answer Edward's question too.

As far as why we are developing a makerspace or why we have 3D printers in
the library- I think Jason hit on two really important points - curriculum
and research support. In the library we hardly question buying journals
that cost upwards of $15K that may only support one department and in some
cases just one individual researcher. The 3D printer is already supporting
several schools and departments in terms of both research and curriculum.
There is a 3D printer in a department on our campus but the problem is-
the department keeps it under lock and key and students only get access to
that printer if they take a certain class within that specific department.
Here in the academic library- we are available to everyone on campus- no
lock and key, no special hours...we provide access to a much needed
service. Even over the summer- we've had faculty from Engineering,
Chemistry, and Art jumping in and working this service into their
curriculum even further now that they have access to the production
machine- it's a total win.

Previously a number of students and faculty has been sending their files
out to be printed at a rather high cost and turnaround time. This
eliminates that and allows our community to prototype more quickly and
more often. Chemistry has really gone far with this- one faculty remarked
that this has changed the way he does research now. Rapid prototyping is
critical.

As for equipment that is more dangerous to use- I've worked closely with
the local makerspace here in Reno, Bridgewire, and they've created a
student membership. They have and are going to continue to do workshops
for us here and they hold all kinds of workshops and events in their own
space. Anything that may be considered a liability is done on their
property and they have insurance. More recently, we are looking into
partnering with the campus machine shop. Again- they are well suited to
this kind of thing and take the necessary precautions.

I see the library as a bridge between a lot of these resources- we
communicate regularly with various groups to make sure students and
faculty get whatever resources they need- whether that's an article, a
book, a 3D printer, or access to a CNC machine.

My interest is in getting what our community needs, so while I keep an eye
out for how the laws will change in relation to these technologies, I
focus on serving the users and building the community. It's been
transformative here from when we were a building full of lots of print
books with very few people at all to now where we have open collaborative
space, 3D printers, button makers, poster printers, AR Drones, various
software, etc....and a LOT more users. We've seen the highest numbers of
users in this building that we've ever seen here. We have also heard from
several professors from different areas in full support of what we are
doing and praise the changes we've made here. At one point not too long
ago if you asked me what would happen to this library, I probably would
have said that it would be closed in the not too distant future; we've
totally turned that around because we've embraced our community and given
them something irresistible. The students graduating from here will have
had experience with technologies and learning in an environment that
encourages creating, which many other students across the country don't
have access to. I think it gives our students an advantage in a number of
industries where companies will be creating new kinds of jobs that we
can't yet imagine.


Our staff are the same existing staff that were here previously. No one is
specially trained- everyone has printed on the 3D printer- including all
of our student workers. It's fun, so it hasn't been a hard sell to anyone
to make something and learn...which is pretty cool. We set up the 3D Touch
printer ourselves- in fact the students busted open the box the second it
arrived, set it up and started printing. I wasn't even in the building
when that all happened- they took it on and I'm happy about that.

The production machine we have - the Uprint SE needed setup from the
vendor. He did a fairly quick rundown of how it all works and did the
machine setup for us. Since then it's been going non-stop without much
maintenance.

Out of both of the machines, the hobbyist machine has needed more
maintenance from us in terms of keeping it going well. The higher end
machine has been invaluable in that it runs without lots of "care and
feeding". 

We have a couple of different options available for 3D software and we
have a number of students and student workers who are already well-versed
in creating with these tools. We are asking them to teach others and give
workshops- this works well as most of our students prefer to learn from
other students in a casual way. Our staff may not be 3D experts but we are
a learning organization and everyone jumps in when help is needed- we do
our best and work through the problems- then share with each other when we
learn something new. Most seem to learn best by doing and we do a lot. :)

--Lisa

____________________________
Lisa Kurt
Engineering + Emerging Technologies Librarian
DeLaMare Science and Engineering Library
University of Nevada, Reno
phone: 775.682.5706








On 8/27/12 10:48 AM, "Nate Hill" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>Joe, and really everyone, I think this is all a question of scope, scale
>and community needs/demands.
>I absolutely think creative/generative/participatory spaces belong in
>public libraries.
>I firmly believe that the public library of the future is as much about
>access to tools as it about access to media, especially as we read about
>the "creative economy" and watch art, music, and shop programs get dropped
>in public schools.
>
>That said,
>I have no intention of bringing welders into the library for the liability
>reasons you cite.
>I seek to partner with other community organizations that can provide
>these
>services.... this is why I was asking if academic libraries might have
>similar partnerships with academic departments.
>
>And that said,
>There are many, many 'maker' activities public libraries already support
>and more we can expand to support.
>(think craft time in the kids room)
>
>Whether it is soldering, graphic design software, or making sock puppets,
>the public library is as much about these informal learning experiences as
>it is about access to Grisham, Shakespeare and JK Rowling.
>
>
>On Mon, Aug 27, 2012 at 1:03 PM, Joe Hourcle
><[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>
>> On Aug 27, 2012, at 9:44 AM, BWS Johnson wrote:
>>
>> > Salvete!
>> >
>> >     Can't. Resist. Bait. Batman.
>> >
>> >
>> >> Can anyone on the list help clarify for me why, in an academic
>>setting,
>> >> this kind of equipment and facility isn't part of a laboratory in an
>> >> academic department?
>> >>
>> >
>> >     I'd say that I hate to play devil's advocate, but that would be a
>> patent misrepresentation of material fact.
>> >
>> >     Conversely, could you please tell us why you think it *shouldn't*
>>be
>> at the Library?
>>
>>
>> I can think of one reason they shouldn't be *anywhere*:  liability.
>>
>> When I was working on my undergrad, in civil engineering, the
>>university's
>> science and engineering school had their own machine shop.
>>
>> Officially, you were only supposed to use it if you were a grad student,
>> or supervised by a grad student.
>>
>> Yet, there were a number of us (the undergrad population) who had more
>> experience than the grad students.  (I had done a couple years of shop
>> class during high school, one of the other students had learned from his
>> father who worked in the trade, another was going back to school after
>> having been a professional machinist for years,  etc.).
>>
>> So well, I know at least two of us would go down and use the shop
>>without
>> supervision.  (and in a few cases, all alone, which is another violation
>> when you're working at 1am and there's no one to call for medical
>> assistance should something go really, really wrong).
>>
>> And in some cases, we'd teach the grad students who were doing stuff
>>wrong
>> (trying to take off too much material in a pass, using the incorrect
>>tools,
>> etc.  But I made just as many mistakes.  (when you're in a true machine
>> shop, and there's two different blades for the bandsaw with different
>>TPI,
>> it's not that one's for metal and one's for wood ... as they don't do
>>wood
>> cutting there ... but I must've broken and re-welded the blade a half
>>dozen
>> times and gone through a quart of cutting fluid to make only a few
>>cuts, as
>> I didn't realize that I should've been using the lower TPI blade for
>> cutting aluminum)
>>
>>
>> I admit I don't know enough about these 'maker spaces' ... I assume
>> there'd have to be some training / certification before using the
>> equipment.  The other option would be to treat it more like a print
>>shop,
>> where someone drops off their item to be printed, and then comes back to
>> pick it up after the job's been run.
>>
>> And it's possible that you're using less dangerous equipment.  (eg, when
>> in high school, my senior year we got a new principal who required that
>>all
>> teachers wear ties ... including the shop teachers.  Have you ever seen
>> what happens when a tie gets caught in a lathe or a printing press?
>>He's
>> lucky the teachers were experienced, as a simple mistake could've killed
>> them)
>>
>> But even something as simple as a polishing/grinding wheel could be a
>> hazard to both the person using it and anyone around them.  (I remember
>>one
>> of my high school shop teachers not happy that I was so aggressive when
>> grinding down some steel, as I was spraying sparks near his desk ...
>>which
>> could've started a fire)
>>
>> ... so the whole issue of making sure that no one gets injured / killed
>>/
>> damages others is one of the liability issues, but I also remember when
>>I
>> worked for the university computer lab, we had a scanner that you could
>> sign up to use.  One day, one of the university police saw what one of
>>the
>> students was doing, and insisted that we were allowing students to make
>> fake IDs.  (the student in question had scanned in a CD cover, which
>>was a
>> distorted drivers license looking thing ... if he was trying to make a
>>fake
>> ID, you'd think he'd have started from a genuine ID card)
>>
>> As we've now got people who are printing gun receivers, there's a real
>> possibility that people could be printing stuff that might be in
>>violation
>> of the law.  (I won't get into the issue of if it's a stupid law or not
>>...
>> this is something the legal department needs to weigh in on).  And
>> conversely, if you're a public institution and you censor what people
>>are
>> allowed to make, then you get into first amendment issues.
>>
>> ...
>>
>> On a completely unrelated note, when I first saw the question about
>> libraries & maker spaces, I was thinking in the context of public
>> libraries, and thought the idea was pretty strange.  I see a much better
>> fit for academic libraries, but I'm still not 100% sold on it.  In
>>part, I
>> know that it's already possible to get a lot of stuff 'made' at most
>> universities, but you risk treading on certain trade's toes, which could
>> piss off the unions.  Eg, we had a sign shop who had some CNC cutters
>>for
>> sheet goods (this was the mid 1990s), carpenters and such under the
>> building maintenance, large scale printing and book binding through the
>> university graphics department (they later outsourced the larger jobs,
>>got
>> rid of the binding equipment).
>>
>> I could see the equipment being of use to these groups, but I don't know
>> that they'd be happy if their lack of control over being able to make
>>money
>> by charging for their services would go over well.
>>
>> I would assume that if you were to move forward with this, that you'd
>>need
>> to identify the groups that could make use of it, how it might affect
>>other
>> groups (eg, those people that charged for performing these services),
>>and
>> try to get buy-in from all communities.  You don't need a union picket
>>line
>> popping up because they think you're trying to take their jobs.*
>>
>> -Joe
>>
>>
>> * I'm generally pro-union, but I'm still bitter about an incident where
>>I
>> had a couple of hours of my time wasted at the San Francisco Moscone
>> Center, as a I needed our crate to pack up monitors, and I got it 1/2
>>way
>> out of their storage area before someone noticed me ... and he spent
>>more
>> time giving me a lecture about how that was someone else's job (as if my
>> intention was union busting), when he could've just said they wanted to
>>get
>> the carpet up first before rolling crates around ... then I had to sit
>> around for another hour, because he insisted on rolling my crate all the
>> way back to where it was ... and finally, he noticed me getting
>>annoyed, so
>> he called in someone to deliver the crate, so they brought in someone
>>with
>> a forklift to move it the 30-odd yards when it had its own damned wheels
>> and if I'd have gone under the curtain, it would've only had to go 5
>>yards)
>>
>>
>> [and um ... insert standard disclaimer about how I'm not speaking for my
>> employer, etc.]
>>
>
>
>
>-- 
>Nate Hill
>[log in to unmask]
>http://www.natehill.net

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTS.CLIR.ORG

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager